Volkswagen Presents Temporary Auto Pilot Technology

Volkswagen Temporary Auto Pilot

Volkswagen Temporary Auto Pilot

TAP will maintain a safe distance from the vehicle ahead, drives at a driver-specified speed, reducing it as srequired for bends and will keep the vehicle centred to lanes by using lane markers.

The final presentation of the EU research project HAVEit (Highly Automated Vehicles for Intelligent Transport) has seen Executive Director Volkswagen Group Research, Prof Dr Jurgen Leohold, has presented the "Temporary Auto Pilot" by Volkswagen. With driver monitoring, the car can semi-automatically drive, at speeds up to 130 kilometres per hour on motorways.

"Above all, what we have achieved today is an important milestone on the path towards accident-free car driving," said Leohold at the final presentation The Temporary Auto Pilot (TAP) bundles semi-automatic functions - functions monitored by the driver - with other driver assistance systems, such as ACC adaptive cruise control and the Lane Assist lane-keeping system into one comprehensive function. "Nonetheless, the driver always retains driving responsibility and is always in control," he continues. "The driver can override or deactivate the system at any time and must continually monitor it."

TAP offers an optimal degree of automation as a function of the driving situation, acquisition of the surroundings and driver and system states. The technology aims to correct driver error by an inattentive or distracted driver, therefore preventing an accident.

TAP will maintain a safe distance from the vehicle ahead, drives at a driver-specified speed, reducing it as required for bends and will keep the vehicle centred to lanes by using lane markers. They system will also utilise overtaking rules and respect speed limits. Stop and start driving manoeuvres in traffic jams will also be taken care of. Whilst the car can drive on motorways, the driver must be constantly vigilant to intervene in safety-critical situations.

The Temporary Auto Pilot system makes use of a production-level radar-, camera-, and ultrasonic-based sensors as well as a laser scanner and an electronic horizon. “One conceivable scenario for its initial use might be in monotonous driving situations, e.g. in traffic jams or over sections of a driving route that are exceedingly speed-limited,” comments Leohold.

Published 23 June 2011 Staff

The information contained this Volkswagen news article may have changed since publication on the 23 June 2011. Our car specifications, reviews, and prices may only apply to the UK market. You may wish to check with the manufacturer or your local Volkswagen dealer, before making a purchasing decision. E.&.O.E. You may NOT reproduce our car news in full or part, in any format without our written permission. carpages.co.uk © 2017