Toyota GT86 Review (2012)

Toyota GT86 Review (2012)
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Toyota GT86 Review (2012)

Toyota GT86 Review  | Part TwoToyota GT86 Road Test

Toyota developed the car jointly with another Japanese manufacturer, Subaru, and it is powered by Subaru’s horizontally-opposed ‘boxer’ engine and produced in Japan at a Subaru factory.

Toyota is the world’s biggest producer of cars, and the Japanese company has quite a serious reputation, best known for its small coupes and its very successful hybrid the Prius. But it has its fun side too, as some of the sports cars it has made in the past verify – such as the MR2, Celica and the 2000GT that earned lasting fame when it featured in the Bond film ‘You Only Live Twice’. Now here is Toyota’s new generation sports coupe, the GT86.

Designed as a two-door, 2+2 seater with a front engine and traditional rear-wheel-drive, the GT86 is intended to be fun to drive and to add some glamour to the Toyota range. It achieves both aims. Classically styled with a long nose and sloping tail, it looks the part too. Toyota developed the car jointly with another Japanese manufacturer, Subaru, and it is powered by Subaru’s horizontally-opposed ‘boxer’ engine and produced in Japan at a Subaru factory.

Newly on the market in the summer of 2012, the GT86 is available with a manual gearbox at £24,995, or with an auto box with a sequential manual-shift option and steering column paddle shifts at £26,495.

Performance

The GT86 has a two-litre, four-cylinder Subaru boxer engine in which the pistons punch horizontally in opposition, hence the name. It produces a strong power output of 197 bhp peaking at a high 7,000 rpm, and the peak torque is 151 lb ft at 6,400 to 6,600 rpm. With a top speed of 130 mph and capable of a 0-62 mph sprint in 8.2 seconds, it is quite a decent performer.

A manual gearbox version is available, but the model we tested was equipped with the six-speed automatic transmission, and it suits the car pretty well. The CO2 output is 164 g/km, putting the car in VED band G for the annual road tax disc. Its combined fuel economy figure nudging 40 mpg suggests that the fuel bill should not be too outrageous for a car with this performance.

Toyota GT86 Review  | Part TwoToyota GT86 Road Test

The information contained within this Toyota GT86 review may have changed since publication on the 1 October 2012. The actual model road tested may feature options and functionality specific to that model, which may not be available as on option or be fitted to other models in the range. Options may not be available on UK specification cars. You may wish to check with your local Toyota dealer, before making a purchasing decision. E.&.O.E. You may NOT reproduce this car review in full or part, in any format without our written permission. carpages.co.uk © 2018