Subaru B9 Tribeca Review

Subaru B9 Tribeca
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Subaru B9 Tribeca Review

Subaru B9 Tribeca ReviewSubaru B9 Tribeca Road Test

Tribeca The second row of seats have a 60:40 split and fold function and slide fore and aft for extra legroom (not that you need it) or to allow passengers into the third row, in the 7-seater.

The second row of seats have a 60:40 split and fold function and slide fore and aft for extra legroom (not that you need it) or to allow passengers into the third row, in the 7-seater. Of course, there is a penalty for having the extra row. Luggage capacity in the 5-seater ranges from 525-litres, all seats up and measured up to the window-line, to 1,671-litres to the roof, with the seats down. In the 7-seater the respective figures are 128- and 1495-litres.

The load platform is quite high making it easier to load and the floor panels hide two compartments; one houses the tool kit and the other has an array of compartments for keeping cameras and valuables out of sight.

The cabin is remarkable but the best part is the fascia, which is both innovative and impressive - so much so that it won an award in America . The dash is made up of swooping curves that, from the driver's seat, can be seen in the rear-view mirror, echoed in the shape of the tailgate window.

There are three layers flowing out of the door frames; beige at the bottom, black at the top divided by an aluminium strip, which expands and swoops down to form the centre console, ending between the front seats - it is cosy and stylish at the same time.

The rounded, centre console features chunky, tactile comfort-control knobs with inset digital temperature readouts in the centre. Above these are the audio controls and above that, a nacelle housing the large touch screen for the Satellite-Navigation and other control functions.

The front of the Tribeca has more than a hint of SEAT about it. Subaru describes it as having a 'Spread-Wing' design with the centre grille representing the fuselage of an aeroplane and the flanking air intakes are the wings.

A swage line develops from just behind the front doors, becoming deeper and stronger as it wraps around the back, taking in the rear light clusters. This adds to the car's sporty look, which is enhanced by the 18-inch alloy wheels.

The B9 Tribeca has a slightly lower roofline than the X5 and XC90 but has more ground clearance and a lower centre of gravity than the German car. While it doesn't have a low-ratio gearbox, the Tribeca does have Subaru's proven, full-time AWD system. Under normal circumstances, this provides a 45/55 front and rear torque distribution, until the Vehicle Dynamic Control system says otherwise.

Subaru B9 Tribeca ReviewSubaru B9 Tribeca Road Test
Subaru B9 Tribeca Road Test Data
Model ReviewedSubaru B9 Tribeca SE5
  
Body TypeSUV
ColourObsidian Black Pearl
  
Performance (manufacturers data) 
  
0 - 62 mph9.7 Seconds
Top Speed 121 mph
  
Transmission5-Speed Automatic Gearbox
  
Fuel TypeUnleaded - Petrol
  
CO2 Emissions (NEDC Figures) g/km
  
Economy (NEDC Figures) 
  
Urban16.6 mpg
Extra Urban29.7 mpg
Combined23.0 mpg
  
Insurance Group16
Euro NCAP RatingTBA
Warranty3-Year/60,000 Warranty
Price (when tested on the 20/12/06)£31,995

The information contained within this Subaru B9 Tribeca review may have changed since publication on the 20 December 2006. The actual model road tested may feature options and functionality specific to that model, which may not be available as on option or be fitted to other models in the range. Options may not be available on UK specification cars. You may wish to check with your local Subaru dealer, before making a purchasing decision. E.&.O.E. You may NOT reproduce this car review in full or part, in any format without our written permission. carpages.co.uk © 2019