Skoda Superb Estate Review (2013)

Skoda Superb Estate Review (2013)
76%

Skoda Superb Estate Review (2013)

Skoda Superb Estate Review  | Part TwoSkoda Superb Estate Road Test

The four-wheel-drive system is intelligent and is capable of re-distributing the power to the wheels that need drive ...

The Skoda Superb Outdoor takes the standard Superb Estate and adds four-wheel-drive plus there is the addition of some over cladding to protect the bodywork but the ride height remains the same unlike the Audi A4 Allroad and VW Passat Alltrack – oddly you can also buy a 4x4 Superb Estate which is pretty much the same car but without the plastic moulding.

There are three diesel engines available (no petrol options) for the Skoda Superb Outdoor, 1.8-litre TSI with manual transmission, 2.0-litre TDI CR 140PS with DSG gearbox and the 2.0-litre TDI CR 170PS with a 6-speed manual box.

What we tested

We tested the Skoda Superb Outdoor TDI 4x4 170PS diesel with a six-speed manual gearbox which at the time of testing cost £27,600.

Driving & Performance

The 2.0-litre 170 PS engine is capable of 0-62 mph in 8.8 seconds and a top speed of 135 mph, which in our opinion is a perfectly acceptable blend of performance and economy although it can feel a little underpowered at times, especially up when pressing on uphill.

On paper the 2.0-litre 170PS TSI engine is capable of a combined fuel consumption figure of 49.6 mpg (all NEDC figures) – we were achieving around 43.5 mpg touring.

The Superb Outdoor handles well – surprisingly well – body roll is kept well in check and the steering offers reasonable feedback. You have the reassurance of four-wheel-drive in inclement weather which given some of our recent winters can only be a plus point - the only negative is that you are not going to get too far off road and the ride height is no different than the two wheel drive Superb Estate.

The four-wheel-drive system is intelligent and is capable of re-distributing the power to the wheels that need drive – in normal conditions most of the power goes to the front. However should you lose traction up to 90 per cent of the power can be sent to the rear wheels with as much as 85% of the available torque being able to go to one wheel individually.

Normally in this class of car we would expect to see an automatic gear box available but the 2.0-litre 170PS is only available with a six-manual transmission which to be honest was perfectly ok and gear changes were precise.

In summary nothing to complain about, the engine is a bit rumbly when cold but it soon settles down and it feels responsive.

Skoda Superb Estate Review  | Part TwoSkoda Superb Estate Road Test

The information contained within this Skoda Superb review may have changed since publication on the 19 July 2013. The actual model road tested may feature options and functionality specific to that model, which may not be available as on option or be fitted to other models in the range. Options may not be available on UK specification cars. You may wish to check with your local Skoda dealer, before making a purchasing decision. E.&.O.E. You may NOT reproduce this car review in full or part, in any format without our written permission. carpages.co.uk © 2017