Saab 9-3X Review

The Saab 9-3X
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Saab 9-3X Review

Saab 9-3X 2.0T XWD Review | Part TwoSaab 9-3X 2.0T XWD Review | Part ThreeSaab 9-3X 2.0T XWD Road Test

Asked to name a 4x4 estate car, and chances are that the Subaru Forester, the Volvo XC70 or perhaps an Audi or two were amongst those on the list.

Asked to name a 4x4 estate car, and chances are that the Subaru Forester, the Volvo XC70 or perhaps an Audi or two were amongst those on the list. But there is another to be considered - the Saab 9-3X.

It was launched at the Geneva Motor Show earlier this year (2009) to 'rave reviews', which should be a hint to its looks and prowess. Customers could buy their new Saab 9-3X from May onwards, for delivery in August and, while I'm sure that many did just that, the Saab 9-3X is in danger of being overlooked.

A combination of the current economic climate, the uncertainty concerning the marque and its relationship with the troubled GM (which should be resolved shortly), combined with the fact that the so-called Crossover market is full to brimming with vehicles, all vying for our attention, might just put a damper on the enthusiasm. This is especially so if some of the others could be perceived as maybe a little more exciting.

However, the Saab 9-3X is more than worthy of attention and for the company, the Saab Salomon Trial Running Series 2009, which was part of the Keswick Mountain Festival, was the perfect place to show off the new car.

Now, there is room for confusion here; although the name 9-3X suggests that it is a genuine 4x4, it is only the 2.0T version that has All Wheel Drive Capability and the alternative engine, the 1.9TTiD does not.

The 'X' part comes from the extra ride height, which makes the AWD version 35mm taller than the standard Sport Wagon and the petrol version is 20mm taller than its more normal counterpart. It doesn't seem a lot but it is enough to cope with the lighter side of off-road terrain.

And more to the point, it looks the part. Which is not to say that it is all cosmetic, as a rugged image is just as important for many other manufacturers in this segment. Crossovers are designed for gravel, grass, farm tracks and generally loose surfaces where a little more traction and pulling power is needed. At the same time crossovers have to look equally as good around town and provide a comfortable ride on the open road. Furthermore, crossovers benefit from not carrying the weight of a full-blown SUV and are therefore also more fuel efficient.

Saab 9-3X Review | Part Two
Saab 9-3X 2.0T XWD Review | Part TwoSaab 9-3X 2.0T XWD Review | Part ThreeSaab 9-3X 2.0T XWD Road Test
Saab 9-3X Road Test Data
Model ReviewedSaab 9-3X 2.0T XWD
  
Body TypeEstate
ColourArctic White
  
Performance (manufacturers data) 
  
0 - 62 mph8.2 seconds
Top Speed 143 mph
  
Transmission6-Speed Manual
  
Fuel TypeUnleaded Petrol
  
CO2 Emissions (NEDC Figures) g/km
  
Economy (NEDC Figures) 
  
Urban24.8 mpg
Extra Urban45.6 mpg
Combined34.9 mpg
  
Insurance Group15
Euro NCAP RatingTBA
Warranty3 years / 60000 miles
Price (when tested on the 15/12/09)£25,995

The information contained within this Saab 9-3X review may have changed since publication on the 15 December 2009. The actual model road tested may feature options and functionality specific to that model, which may not be available as on option or be fitted to other models in the range. Options may not be available on UK specification cars. You may wish to check with your local Saab dealer, before making a purchasing decision. E.&.O.E. You may NOT reproduce this car review in full or part, in any format without our written permission. carpages.co.uk © 2017