Nissan X-TRAIL
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Nissan X-Trail Review

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Nissan X-TRAIL Review

The Nissan X-TRAIL 2.2 dCi SVE is equipped with a 2.2 litre dCi turbocharged diesel engine which is available in all the four trim specifications, SE to T-Spec.

23 March 2005 Melanie Carter
How It Drove - Performance

The Nissan X-TRAIL 2.2 dCi SVE is equipped with a 2.2 litre dCi turbocharged diesel engine which is available in all the four trim specifications, SE to T-Spec. Currently the diesel engine is not available with an automatic gearbox, only with a six speed manual gearbox.

The diesel engine was modified at the end of 2003 and the 16 valve twin overhead camshaft, 2,184cc engine's power output rose from 114PS to 136PS, and torque increased from 270Nm to a hefty 314Nm. Since torque was also stronger at lower revs, driveability was also improved and while the top speed went up from 107 to 112mph, and the 0-62 mph time down from 12.7 to 11.5 seconds (two-wheel drive 11.2), the economy figures remained unchanged, returning 39.2 mpg (two-wheel drive 39.8mpg) on a combined cycle.

Like most diesel engines we found it noisy on cold start up but it soon settles down when warmed up. Once on the move the engine noise does not really intrude and you tend forget that it is a diesel. We are becoming more and more happy driving diesels, not too long ago it would have been a chore. Now we can only see the benefits, better low down torque and acceleration coupled with better fuel economy. During our time with the dCi X-TRAIL we achieved circa 37 mpg, which we consider to be quite good.

The 6-speed manual gearbox is very easy to use and very car like in operation, the clutch is well weighted and light to use. The five close ratio gears are topped with a long overdrive sixth gear suited to motorway cruising, resulting in lower engine speeds and better fuel consumption.

You can switch the transmission into ‘2WD’, ‘AUTO’ (automatically switches between 2 & 4 wheel depending on conditions) or ‘LOCK’ (locks the car into 4 wheel drive mode). In normal driving conditions you would leave the X-TRAIL in two wheel drive (driving the front wheels only) as it saves on wear and tear - and more importantly it saves fuel.

How It Drove - Ride and Handling

For a relatively large SUV the Nissan X-TRAIL is surprisingly nimble with well weighted steering and limited body roll, in fact unlike some SUV's it is very car like to drive.

The ride is supple and levels of grip are impressive making the X-TRAIL entertaining to drive and of course you do benefit from four wheel traction when necessary in the form of Nissan's ALL MODE 4x4 system the first electronic four-wheel drive system to be seen in a compact SUV.

Nissan X-TRAIL ReviewNissan X-TRAIL Review | Part ThreeNissan X-TRAIL Review | Part FourNissan X-TRAIL Review | Part FiveNissan X-TRAIL Road Test
Nissan X-Trail Road Test Data
Model ReviewedNissan X-TRAIL 2.2 DCi SVE
  
Body Type4x4
ColourZinc Metallic
  
Performance (manufacturers data) 
  
0 - 62 mph11.5 Seconds
Top Speed 112 mph
  
Transmission6-Speed Manual
  
Fuel TypeDiesel
  
CO2 Emissions (NEDC Figures) g/km
  
Economy (NEDC Figures) 
  
Urban31.4 mpg
Extra Urban45.6 mpg
Combined39.2 mpg
  
Insurance Group11
Euro NCAP Rating4
Warranty3-year or 60,000 miles warranty
3-ear paint warranty
6-year anti-corrosion warranty
Price (when tested on the 23/03/05)£ 22,645

The information contained within this Nissan X-Trail review may have changed since publication on the 23 March 2005. The actual model road tested may feature options and functionality specific to that model, which may not be available as on option or be fitted to other models in the range. Options may not be available on UK specification cars. You may wish to check with your local Nissan dealer, before making a purchasing decision. E.&.O.E. You may NOT reproduce this car review in full or part, in any format without our written permission. carpages.co.uk © 2015