Mazda6 Estate Review

Mazda6 Estate
80%

Mazda Mazda6 Review

Mazda6 Estate ReviewMazda6 Estate Review | Part ThreeMazda6 Road Test

The Mazda6 Sport Estate sits on 18” alloy wheels and the ride quality is particularly compliant on British roads soaking up pot holes with consummate ease.

The Mazda6 Sport Estate sits on 18” alloy wheels and the ride quality is particularly compliant on British roads soaking up pot holes with consummate ease. The handling is not the best in its class which is a bit of a shame and there is some body roll when cornering. The steering feels a little too light for our taste but it isn’t all bad and you can enjoy ‘B’ roads at some pace, after all this an estate car.

The Sport model we were testing has a keyless entry and start system. This uses a fob-type key to automatically unlock the door when you pull open the doors. To lock the car you simply touch a button on the door handle. To start and stop the car you push the start/stop ignition button in the instrument panel. It does take some time to try not to switch off the ignition with the non-existent key -  the car can only be started with the clutch depressed.

Getting in and out of the Mazda6 is fairly easy when compared to the old car; both front and rear seat passengers should have plenty of legroom and headroom. Rear seat occupants get more headroom than the hatchback or saloon passengers. The two outermost rear seats get child isoFix fitting points with a top tether point in the back of the seat.

On the road all round vision is good, it is relatively easy to manoeuvre and easy to park but we were surprised to see that the Mazda6 Sport Estate did not have rear parking sensors, they are specified on the next model up - the Sport Luxury.

The Mazda6 estate benefits from what Mazda call the Karakuri fold-flat seating system, which simply means that there is a lever either side of the boot which you can pull one handed to drop the rear seats without having to touch the seats. I thought it was a novelty until I put it into practice on several trips to my local DIY store.

The tonneau cover is another touch of Japanese thinking at its best. It was created so that owners no longer need to manually pull across or retract the tonneau cover when loading and unloading items from the boot.  Inspired in part by the traditional Japanese art of Origami paper folding, development engineers at Mazda carefully scrutinised office and domestic furniture drawers and curtain rails for their smooth sliding mechanisms and durability. Again it works well but I could not easily get it back in place after my trip to the DIY store, I will consult the manual next time.

Mazda6 Estate ReviewMazda6 Estate Review | Part ThreeMazda6 Road Test
Mazda Mazda6 Road Test Data
Model ReviewedMazda Mazda Mazda6 2.5 Sport Estate
  
Body TypeEstate
ColourStormy Blue Mica
  
Performance (manufacturers data) 
  
0 - 62 mph8.3 Seconds
Top Speed 135 mph
  
Transmission6-Speed Manual
  
Fuel TypeUnleaded Petrol
  
CO2 Emissions (NEDC Figures) g/km
  
Economy (NEDC Figures) 
  
Urban25.2 mpg
Extra Urban44.1 mpg
Combined34.4 mpg
  
Insurance Group12
Euro NCAP RatingTBA
Warranty3-Year or 60,000 Mile Warranty
Price (when tested on the 05/08/08)£20,340 OTR (Test car £20,715 includes £375 Mica Paint)

The information contained within this Mazda 6 review may have changed since publication on the 5 August 2008. The actual model road tested may feature options and functionality specific to that model, which may not be available as on option or be fitted to other models in the range. Options may not be available on UK specification cars. You may wish to check with your local Mazda dealer, before making a purchasing decision. E.&.O.E. You may NOT reproduce this car review in full or part, in any format without our written permission. carpages.co.uk © 2017