Range Rover Sport TDV8 Review (2007)

Range Rover Sport Interior
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Range Rover Sport Review

Range Rover Sport TDV8 ReviewRange Rover Sport TDV8 Review  | Part TwoRange Rover Sport TDV8 Review  | Part ThreeRange Rover Sport TDV8 Review  | Part Four

Our car was fitted with a Harman/Kardon Logic 7 Hi-Fi system (£1000 Premium ICE Pack) plus the DVD multimedia system (Twin Screen DVD rear seat entertainment system £2250) with a digital hybrid TV tuner (£500).

We found that when using the car at night the heating elements in the front windscreen at first were a bit of a distraction which was particularly apparent on the motorway with oncoming traffic. Plus the interior lighting was not very refined - the map reading lights being too bright.

The windscreen wipers as you would expect are rain sensitive, but strangely during the time we had the car, amazingly it did not rain.

Between the front seats there is a fridge, which worked very well to keep our supply of drinks and chocolate cool.

The HSE TDV8 Sport is fitted with Adaptive Cruise Control and Forward Alert, which uses a radar to scan the road ahead, which when cruise control is set will match your speed to the vehicle in front, settling down behind it, adapting your speed to theirs. If they move out of the way your speed will increase back to your set cruise control limit, should they brake you will be warned to intervene. It works exceedingly well, the best of all the ACC systems we have tested. On a trip from Exeter to Skipton (300 miles) we simply set our desired cruising speed and pretty much left the Sport to its own devices with very little human intervention, albeit on a pretty quiet road at night. The forward alert system will warn you that you are approaching a vehicle or obstacle without braking, this can be switched off.

Infotainment

Our car was fitted with a Harman/Kardon Logic 7 Hi-Fi system (£1000 Premium ICE Pack) plus the DVD multimedia system (Twin Screen DVD rear seat entertainment system £2250) with a digital hybrid TV tuner (£500). Yes, rear seat passengers could watch digital TV on the move, with the TFT screens being set into the back of the head rests. Whilst stationary the driver and front seat passenger could also view the TV via the Satellite Navigation screen, although sound was available to all. There is also a DVD player so you could watch you favourite films on the move. Depending on your view it is great for entertaining children on a long journey. The two outer rear passengers can use the supplied headphones, so as not to disturb other passengers or the driver. It is possible to listen to different sound sources, i.e. the CD in the front, whilst the TV is being used in the rear. The multimedia system has a remote control, so that the driver is not disturbed when on the move.

The touch screen Satellite Navigation system is standard on the HSE model we were testing, it worked very well and includes TMC which updates the Navigation and adjusts your route in the event of accidents and delays. You can enter addresses by post code or full address.  There is even an off-road navigation mode which can track you off-road, it includes a compass so you can keep a heading and you can even leave tracks – so you can follow your route home or note progress.

How It Looks -

There is no doubt that this is a Range Rover and although it may not have the commanding presence of its bigger brother the Range Rover, people are certainly going to take notice.

Where the Range Rover is a fat cat the Sport is a lean leopard under the bonnet.

The Sport has all the key Range Rover styling cues but with a more active feel to the design. The ‘floating roof’ remains thanks to the black roof pillars and the lower than normal roofline tapers gently down extending beyond the rear of the car to form a spoiler for improved aerodynamics.
Aerodynamics was one of the main areas of attention for the designers. To this end the bonnet lacks the ridges of the Range Rover, the front windscreen is more steeply raked and there are side skirts and front and rear spoilers to deflect and control the air around the car while offering protection to the paintwork. The front spoiler is made from rubber to help cope with the inevitable bumps that occur when off-roading.
The front end has a hint of the Range Stormer concept, unveiled at NAIAS in 2004. It looks big and mean, especially with the perforated grille slats that look like they’ve been in a shoot-out. The headlights are narrower than those on the Range Rover and Discovery3 and are adaptive so that they follow the movement of the steering wheel . At the rear, the tailgate is not as slabby as the Range Rover and instead of the two-piece it has a single door but the glazed area can be opened separately.

How It Looks - Interior

Our interior trim colour was Ivory with Aspen carpets and an Aspen Ivory fascia, which tended to show the dirt and marks, which is a consideration especially with young children onboard even black jeans slightly discoloured the seats, which did come off but we would opt for a darker interior trim.

Overall the plastics and some of the materials could be improved, we found the steering wheel a bit on the hard side and the surround around the Satellite Navigation TFT screen not really up to the mid £50k price tag.

Otherwise the interior is purposeful and looks in keeping with the exterior of the car.

Rivals
Range Rover Sport TDV8 ReviewRange Rover Sport TDV8 Review  | Part TwoRange Rover Sport TDV8 Review  | Part ThreeRange Rover Sport TDV8 Review  | Part Four
Range Rover Sport Road Test Data
Model ReviewedLand Rover Range Rover Sport TDV8 HSE
  
Body Type4x4
ColourLucerne Green
  
Performance (manufacturers data) 
  
0 - 62 mph8.6 Seconds
Top Speed 130 mph
  
Transmission6-Speed CommandShift Automatic Gearbox
  
Fuel TypeDiesel
  
CO2 Emissions (NEDC Figures) g/km
  
Economy (NEDC Figures) 
  
Urban19.3 mpg
Extra Urban31.4 mpg
Combined25.5 mpg
  
Insurance Group16
Euro NCAP Rating
Warranty3-Year, Unlimited Mileage Warranty
Price (when tested on the 14/11/07)£42,140 As Tested

The information contained within this Land Rover Range Rover Sport review may have changed since publication on the 14 November 2007. The actual model road tested may feature options and functionality specific to that model, which may not be available as on option or be fitted to other models in the range. Options may not be available on UK specification cars. You may wish to check with your local Land Rover dealer, before making a purchasing decision. E.&.O.E. You may NOT reproduce this car review in full or part, in any format without our written permission. carpages.co.uk © 2017