Land Rover Freelander 2 Road Test (2013)

Land Rover Freelander (Interior View) (2013)
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Land Rover Freelander Review

Land Rover Freelander 2 ReviewLand Rover Freelander 2 Review  | Part Two

When Land Rover gave the Freelander 2 its recent mid-life revamp, it also took the opportunity to realign the car’s equipment kit list. As a result, some items that were previously options have now been added as standard kit.

Comfort and Refinement

The driving position is fairly upright, but with good adjustment so you can easily get very comfortable behind the wheel. The steering wheel is adjustable too. You sit behind a steep dashboard with an almost vertical central section where all the major switchgear is grouped together in one place. It has a very tidy, symmetrical look and it is quite functional too, although some of the controls are lowish down in the fascia, just above knee level.  The front seats are armchair-like, with armrests on the doors and also centrally-placed ones that can be moved out of the way when not needed.

High on the centre of the dash is a colour touch-screen that looks good with clear displays and is very comprehensive in the interactive displays available. Unfortunately it is not quite as intuitive to use as it could be, and is sometimes a bit slow to respond. The instruments are very nicely designed for clarity and ease of use, and softly back-lit at night. Overall, the interior is very impressive, high quality in design and execution, and very light and bright, with its large area of windows that scoop in all the available ambient light. Anyone with experience of older Freelanders will quickly notice the difference in this one, with a cabin that is much classier than its more cluttered-looking predecessors.

Refinement is pretty reasonable. The engine is relatively unobtrusive unless you work it very hard, and there is not too much road rumble from underneath that high-slung bodywork. Push the car hard along a motorway, and you do notice some wind noise from around the front pillars and mirrors.

Safety and Security

Lots of standard safety kit comes with this car, to keep the driver out of trouble, minimise the risk of adverse driving conditions affecting the stability, and to give driver and passengers good protection if the car is unluckily involved in a collision. The Freelander 2 is a five star car under the Euro NCAP crash test programme, significantly better in its collision behaviour than the first generation model pre-2007.

Standard safety equipment on the car includes seven airbags, electronic traction control, dynamic stability control (DSC), electronic brake force distribution (EBD), emergency brake assist (EBA), rolls stability control (RSC), cornering brake control (CBC). The front seatbelts have pre-tensioners with load limiters, and there are two Isofix child seat anchorage points.

There is remote central locking for all the doors, tailgate and fuel cap, and the car comes equipped with a Thatcham approved perimetric and volumetric alarm system.

Infotainment

When Land Rover gave the Freelander 2 its recent mid-life revamp, it also took the opportunity to realign the car’s equipment kit list. As a result, some items that were previously options have now been added as standard kit. Included in the price of this car are climate control, electric windows and mirrors, electric sunroof, parking sensors, cruise control and leather seats. The standard entertainment kit is a Land Rover 80 watt audio system with eight speakers and DAB digital radio. It is good quality audio and produces high calibre sound.

Rivals
  • Audi Q3
  • Honda CR-V
  • Mazda CX-5
What We Liked
  • Very capable on and off-road, even with two-wheel-drive
  • Strong Land Rover image
  • Good diesel engine with decent power and flexibility
  • Generally pretty good refinement
  • High class cabin is a nice place to be
  • Comfortable seats with armrests in the front
  • UK-built, at Halewood on Merseyside
What We Disliked
  • How pricey it is
  • Satnav screen does not work quite as slickly as it should
  • Some wind noise at speed
  • Bit of body roll on the corners
What We Would Like To See
  • It cost a bit less
Conclusion

The Freelander 2 is still king of the soft-roaders, despite increasing competition from roomier and less expensive rivals. Nothing else delivers quite the same combination of mannerly on-road behaviour, good driving dynamics, and  – when you need it – off-road ability. With its new cabin it is much improved inside and comes better-equipped with more features. The downside is that it’s pretty pricey, especially at the upper end of the range, but you do get a very capable car with that desirable ‘command’ driving position.

27 February 2013 Sue Baker
Land Rover Freelander 2 ReviewLand Rover Freelander 2 Review  | Part Two
Land Rover Freelander Road Test Data
Model ReviewedLand Rover Freelander 2.2 eD4 HSE Lux 2WD
  
Body Type5-door SUV
ColourOrkney Grey
  
Performance (manufacturers data) 
  
0 - 62 mph11.7 Seconds
Top Speed 112 mph
  
Transmission6-Speed Manual
  
Fuel TypeDiesel
  
CO2 Emissions (NEDC Figures) g/km
  
Economy (NEDC Figures) 
  
Urban39.8 mpg
Extra Urban52.3 mpg
Combined47.1 mpg
  
Insurance Group24
Euro NCAP Rating5-stars
Warranty3 Years / Unlimited Miles
Price (when tested on the 27/02/13)£35,500

The information contained within this Land Rover Freelander review may have changed since publication on the 27 February 2013. The actual model road tested may feature options and functionality specific to that model, which may not be available as on option or be fitted to other models in the range. Options may not be available on UK specification cars. You may wish to check with your local Land Rover dealer, before making a purchasing decision. E.&.O.E. You may NOT reproduce this car review in full or part, in any format without our written permission. carpages.co.uk © 2017