The Jaguar R-D6 | Part Four

Jaguar R-D6

 

Inside

To appreciate fully the interior of R-D6 takes a while, partly because you spend as much time touching as you do looking. The materials in the cabin are a blend of classic with a contemporary twist and modern bordering on the futuristic. And as you would expect from Jaguar, there are a couple of refreshingly idiosyncratic touches.

Aluminium features extensively in both milled and formed guise. Two types of leather – lightly grained, carbon-black aniline and 8mm thick black saddle leather – are used throughout the interior. Satin-finish Black American Walnut veneer complements the Piano Black gloss veneer that was introduced on the new XJ.

Probably the best way to visualise the interior of R-D6 is to imagine yourself sitting in the luxurious, moulded composite driver's seat, your back supported by a 'spine' of tensioned leather that weaves through the structure of the seat and then loops forward at the top to provide an integral head restraint. The seat is constructed with internal ducts to allow heating or cooling according to driver preference.

"To my mind, what you're looking at is the ultimate luxury sports interior. Don't just note the fact that there is leather and wood; really study how we've used it. Trust me, this is beyond contemporary."

Ian Callum Director of Design, Jaguar Cars

To one side of you is a door featuring aluminium and two types of leather, and in the centre a section of the American Walnut wood veneer that runs from the front to the rear of the cabin. Controls for motorised movement of the seat are integrated into the recessed armrest. Open the door and a formed aluminium surround is visible, integrating a Jaguar-embossed leather kick-plate.

Your feet rest on wood, which again runs from front to rear. In the area immediately below the seats and extending partially into the footwell, the wood is obscured by a 'floating floor' of tensioned thick saddle leather that 'flows' over the transmission tunnel and is also visible at the outer edges of the cabin floor. The 25mm gap between the leather and the wood, aided by apertures in the latter, forms part of the climate-control system.

"When we started work on the interior, we wanted to only use the materials in an 'honest' way, so the wood is mostly flat and the leather 'drapes' in a natural fashion."

Julian Thomson Chief Designer, Advanced Design, Jaguar Cars

continues... | Part Five
Published 20 September 2003 Melanie Carter

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