Honda Legend Review

Honda Legend Review
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Honda Legend Review

Honda Legend ReviewHonda Legend Review | Part TwoHonda Legend Review | Part ThreeHonda Legend Review | Part FiveHonda Legend Road Test

It is odd to start with but it works well and even on ‘A’ roads (although maybe not recommended), the only downside is that when pulling out to overtake on Motorways it can be a little over judgemental and it can apply the brakes, albeit gently if you don’t use the accelerator to overtake.

Comfort and Refinement

The Honda Legend features all the usual refinements of an executive saloon, there is dual climate control, leather upholstery, electric seats, auto on lights, rain sensitive wipers and Satellite Navigation is standard.

Both the drivers and the front passenger’s seats are electrically powered, with two memory settings on the drivers. The mirrors and steering column are also electrically powered and linked to the memory positions.

If you are a regular Motorway cruiser then you will love these two features: ADAS which comprises of a Lane Keeping Assist System (LKAS) and Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) technology. These state-of-the-art driving aids are designed to improve safety levels and reduce driver fatigue.

LKAS - Lane Keeping Assist System

LKAS recognises the lane that the vehicle is travelling in using images from a camera mounted inside the upper front windscreen and applies the appropriate input to the EPS (Electric Power Steering) to help keep the car in its lane, thereby reducing the burden of Motorway (or similar road) driving and enhancing driver comfort and safety. It then calculates the optimum steering torque - a combination of human input (minimum 20 per cent) and the assisted steering torque (maximum 80 per cent) - to keep the vehicle in the centre of the lane. A continuous beep sound will be emitted when the vehicle is about to cross the lane marking.

LKAS only really works on Dual Carriageways and Motorways as it needs to be able to see two white lines and will only operate at speeds between 45 mph and 112 mph.

In practice we weren’t too sure if it was gimmick or if it was useful but it does work and you can take your hands off the steering wheel (illegal and not recommended) and negotiate reasonable bends - It shows the future of motoring.

What we really liked was Honda’s ACC - Adaptive Cruise Control

Adaptive Cruise Control uses a radar mounted inside the front grille to measure the distance to the vehicle ahead, while vehicle speed and yaw rate sensors detect the vehicle’s driving parameters. Unlike conventional cruise control, it can adjust your speed to the vehicle in front, keeping you always the same distance apart. You can change this distance along the lines of 1, 2 or 3 chevrons apart. When this distance is reduced the system instantly decelerates the vehicle through throttle control and, if necessary, by application of the brakes. In instances where quicker deceleration is required such as being cut-up by another vehicle or sudden braking by the vehicle in front the system will alert the driver with a warning light and a buzzer to prompt the driver to apply the brakes. If the vehicle ahead changes lane or the distance increases again, then the system increases the vehicle speed to the drivers predetermined speed.

It is odd to start with but it works well and even on ‘A’ roads (although maybe not recommended), the only downside is that when pulling out to overtake on Motorways it can be a little over judgemental and it can apply the brakes, albeit gently if you don’t use the accelerator to overtake.

The Legend is fitted with Honda’s new AFS Xenon Headlight system, which has been designed to give increased illumination and visibility at night. When cornering, the headlights swivel by up to 20 degrees according to input from the steering and the car’s speed sensors. This movement can illuminate a larger area of road surface throughout a bend, minimising blind spots and giving improved awareness of the road and surroundings. We weren’t so impressed that the Legend does not feature Bi-Xenon headlights; only the dip beam was powered by what Honda calls HID headlights.

How It Looks - Exterior

A colleague commented that the Honda Legend looked like a grown up Accord, which is little unfair but we don’t feel that it looks that special. If you are person who enjoys your anonymity and doesn’t like wearing designer brands then this could be the car for you as you can drive around without the slightest fuss.

Honda Legend ReviewHonda Legend Review | Part TwoHonda Legend Review | Part ThreeHonda Legend Review | Part FiveHonda Legend Road Test
Honda Legend Road Test Data
Model ReviewedHonda Honda Legend
  
Body Type4-Door Saloon
ColourGraphite Pearl
  
Performance (manufacturers data) 
  
0 - 62 mph7.3 Seconds
Top Speed 155 mph
  
Transmission5-Speed Automatic
  
Fuel TypePetrol
  
CO2 Emissions (NEDC Figures) g/km
  
Economy (NEDC Figures) 
  
Urban17.1 mpg
Extra Urban32.8 mpg
Combined24.6 mpg
  
Insurance Group16E
Euro NCAP RatingTBA
Warranty3-Year / 90,000 Mile Warranty
Price (when tested on the 20/02/07)£39,000

The information contained within this Honda Legend review may have changed since publication on the 20 February 2007. The actual model road tested may feature options and functionality specific to that model, which may not be available as on option or be fitted to other models in the range. Options may not be available on UK specification cars. You may wish to check with your local Honda dealer, before making a purchasing decision. E.&.O.E. You may NOT reproduce this car review in full or part, in any format without our written permission. carpages.co.uk © 2017