Chrysler Crossfire Review

Chrysler Crossfire
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Chrysler Crossfire Review

Chrysler Crossfire ReviewChrysler Crossfire Review | Part TwoChrysler Crossfire Review | Part ThreeChrysler Crossfire Review | Part FiveChrysler Crossfire Road Test

We have said before that the ride is on the hard side, but what else would you expect.

Comfort and Refinement

We have said before that the ride is on the hard side, but what else would you expect. The leather-trimmed seats are accommodating and you do not have to be on smaller size to fit in.

The twin-cockpit theme means that the cabin has been tailored to accommodate two occupants in great comfort. Generous head, shoulder, and leg room ensure that the widest range of occupants will enjoy travelling in Crossfire’s cabin. Both the driver and passengers seats have eight-way power adjustment - horizontal (by up to 194 mm), vertical (by 43 mm), cushion tilt, and backrest angle. Both seats are heated and have Chrysler wing brand marks embossed in the head restraints.

The 380 mm diameter, leather-trimmed steering wheel is adjustable for reach over a 46 mm range, and the height-adjustable driver’s seat enables you to find the perfect driving position. Facing the driver, the three circular dial instrument panel houses four analogue gauges - speedometer, rev-counter, fuel level, and water temperature.

How It Looks - Exterior

American styling with German engineering both retro and futuristic - the words discrete and Crossfire don’t mix, you are going to be noticed. Firstly the exterior is hardly what you might describe as conservative and secondly they are fairly rare.

We can remember driving one of the first UK cars along a section of dual carriageway in the New Forest in December 2003 and it was certainly attention grabbing, nothing short of a Lamborghini would have drawn more attention than the Crossfire brought upon itself. Of course if you are an attention seeker you can always opt for the convertible Chrysler Crossfire Roadster.

We must mention the electric-powered rear spoiler which automatically rises when the Crossfire breaks the 60 mph barrier. Deployment takes less than five seconds and the spoiler generates 356 Newton's of down force to the rear of Crossfire at 80 mph. The spoiler automatically retracts as speeds dip below 40 mph and can be deployed manually at lower speeds using a switch on the centre console. So it is there for other purposes than show, it does cut out a little bit of rear vision but nothing worrying.

The radiator grille expresses the ‘new face of Chrysler’ with a chrome Chrysler winged brand mark forming the leading edge of the bonnet. Vertical ribs in the grille align with those in the bonnet. The headlamp modules are sculpted with four lights that appear to float against the satin silver finish of the nacelles.

Deeply sculpted, simulated air-extractor louvre's behind the front wheel arches hint at a powerful engine and have race car references. Horizontal louvre ribs in satin silver have a jewel-like quality and create an area which will become one of many visual icons for the car.

Chrysler Crossfire ReviewChrysler Crossfire Review | Part TwoChrysler Crossfire Review | Part ThreeChrysler Crossfire Review | Part FiveChrysler Crossfire Road Test
Chrysler Crossfire Road Test Data
Model ReviewedChrysler Crossfire 3.2 V6
  
Body TypeCoupe
ColourGraphite Metallic Clearcoat
  
Performance (manufacturers data) 
  
0 - 62 mph6.5 Seconds
Top Speed 155 mph
  
Transmission5-Speed automatic with autostick and driver selectable summer/winter mode
  
Fuel TypeUnleaded Petrol
  
CO2 Emissions (NEDC Figures) g/km
  
Economy (NEDC Figures) 
  
Urban19.8 mpg
Extra Urban36.7 mpg
Combined28 mpg
  
Insurance Group18
Euro NCAP RatingNo Data
Warranty3-year/60,000 mile mechanical warranty
Price (when tested on the 11/01/05)£ 26,240 OTR
Model tested £ 26,640 includes £400 metallic paint option

The information contained within this Chrysler Crossfire review may have changed since publication on the 11 January 2005. The actual model road tested may feature options and functionality specific to that model, which may not be available as on option or be fitted to other models in the range. Options may not be available on UK specification cars. You may wish to check with your local Chrysler dealer, before making a purchasing decision. E.&.O.E. You may NOT reproduce this car review in full or part, in any format without our written permission. carpages.co.uk © 2018