Chrysler 300C Review

Chrysler 300C Interior
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Chrysler 300C Review

Chrysler 300C ReviewChrysler 300C Review | Part TwoChrysler 300C Review | Part FourChrysler 300C Road Test

Getting in and out of the Chrysler 300C is easy, although some people may find the low roof line a little difficult when getting in - once in headroom is perfectly adequate.

Getting in and out of the Chrysler 300C is easy, although some people may find the low roof line a little difficult when getting in - once in headroom is perfectly adequate.

Shorter drivers may find that they cannot see the extremes of the bonnet, front parking sensors would have been a welcome addition, although you are protected by rear sensors. The thick front pillars can restrict some forward vision.

Getting into the ideal driving position was not easy - both the driver’s and passenger’s seat are electrically adjustable with two memory positions for the driver. The steering wheel is only adjustable for height and this is where the shorter driver may suffer. The seat cushion is quite long and those of you with short legs may find it hard to reach the accelerator and position the steering wheel far enough away from you - our editor was not particularly comfortable but this is very subjective. We also felt that the transmission tunnel intrudes into the driver’s footwell. We were not keen on the one third Faux Tortoise Shell topped Leather wrapped steering wheel which was extremely hard to the touch.

Overall the seats are comfortable, the front benefiting from two stage heating for those cold winter days. There is plenty of leg and headroom for even the tallest of drivers and passengers. The 300C can comfortably seat four adults, the fifth middle seat passenger might complain a little about the transmission tunnel intruding into their foot space and the width of their seat. Most rear seat passengers felt comfortable and cosseted - even commenting that they liked the ride quality.

One thing that is fairly unique to the 300C is that there are isofix child seat fixing points with top tether fixings on all of the three rear seats - which means that you can fit a child seat between the two outer rear seats.

The boot is fairly accommodating at 504 litres (Mercedes E-Class 540 litres / Jaguar XJ 470 litres) plus you can fold down the 60/40 split rear seats to increase the load area. Unfortunately you can only open the boot from the key fob or from a switch on the dashboard.

Chrysler 300C ReviewChrysler 300C Review | Part TwoChrysler 300C Review | Part FourChrysler 300C Road Test
Chrysler 300C Road Test Data
Model ReviewedChrysler 300C 3.0 V6 CRD
  
Body Type4-Door Saloon
ColourBright Silver Metallic Clearcoat
  
Performance (manufacturers data) 
  
0 - 62 mph7.6 Seconds
Top Speed 143 mph
  
Transmission5-Speed Automatic
  
Fuel TypeDiesel
  
CO2 Emissions (NEDC Figures) g/km
  
Economy (NEDC Figures) 
  
Urban26.2 mpg
Extra Urban42.8 mpg
Combined34.9 mpg
  
Insurance Group16
Euro NCAP RatingTBA
Warranty3-Year/60,000 Mile Warranty
Price (when tested on the 05/10/08)£27,505

The information contained within this Chrysler 300C review may have changed since publication on the 5 October 2008. The actual model road tested may feature options and functionality specific to that model, which may not be available as on option or be fitted to other models in the range. Options may not be available on UK specification cars. You may wish to check with your local Chrysler dealer, before making a purchasing decision. E.&.O.E. You may NOT reproduce this car review in full or part, in any format without our written permission. carpages.co.uk © 2017