Chevrolet Captiva Review

Chevrolet Captiva
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Chevrolet Captiva Review

Chevrolet Captiva ReviewChevrolet Captiva Review | Part Two 2008)Chevrolet Captiva Review | Part FourChevrolet Captiva Road Test

All round vision is fairly good and with rear parking sensors the Captiva is easy to park.

All round vision is fairly good and with rear parking sensors the Captiva is easy to park. The elevated driving position gives you a commanding view of the road ahead and it is easy to get in and out of the Captiva, making it ideal for people with mobility problems.

The switch gear and controls are well laid out and our test car was equipped with auto on head lights and rain sensitive wipers which are adjustable for sensitivity. The internal electro-chromatic rear view mirror automatic dips at night masking out following vehicles. The audio controls are accessible from the steering wheel as are the cruise control settings.

There are a good array of storage boxes and cubby holes, with cup holders in the front and rear. There is also a display for the climate control, trip computer and an electronic compass with a storage box on top.

Strangely there is no option for a built in Satellite Navigation system for the Captiva.

Unlike its Vauxhall sibling the Chevrolet Captiva has seven seats, the back row seats hinging out of the boot floor. There is plenty of space for front occupants and middle row passengers, although adult occupants of the two back row seats might object to long journeys.  It is also quite difficult to get in and out of the rear seats, requiring a degree of dexterity best suited to children. Only the middle row two outer seats have Isofix fittings for children’s seats, so on some occasions adults may have to use the rear two seats.

With all the seats occupied there is only space for 85 litres of luggage as the rear row seats swallow up most of the 400 litres which is available with them folded down. Folding the seats up and down is a simple and quick operation. You put just one of the rear seats in place should you only need to carry six people and the middle row can be folded on a 60:40 split, with all the seats down luggage space increases to 1565 litres. There is a tonneau cover to protect your luggage from prying eyes but this can only be used in the five seat configuration. There is a split glass tailgate which means you put things into the boot without letting the dog out.

Over the top of the range Vauxhall Antara you gain the extra two rear seats, but you do lose some of the luxuries such as Satellite Navigation, Xenon headlights and a better level of trim and finish – but you do save over £2,000 and if you don’t need those extras then the Chevrolet Captiva offers better value for money.

Chevrolet Captiva ReviewChevrolet Captiva Review | Part Two 2008)Chevrolet Captiva Review | Part FourChevrolet Captiva Road Test
Chevrolet Captiva Road Test Data
Model ReviewedChevrolet Captiva LTX 2.0VCDi 7-Seat Automatic
  
Body TypeSUV
ColourPoly Silver Metallic
  
Performance (manufacturers data) 
  
0 - 62 mph12.2 Seconds
Top Speed 111 mph
  
Transmission5-Speed Automatic
  
Fuel TypeDiesel
  
CO2 Emissions (NEDC Figures) g/km
  
Economy (NEDC Figures) 
  
Urban37.1 mpg
Extra Urban41.5 mpg
Combined32.1 mpg
  
Insurance Group12
Euro NCAP Rating4
Warranty3-Year or 60,000 Miles
Price (when tested on the 08/10/08)£25,395

The information contained within this Chevrolet Captiva review may have changed since publication on the 8 October 2008. The actual model road tested may feature options and functionality specific to that model, which may not be available as on option or be fitted to other models in the range. Options may not be available on UK specification cars. You may wish to check with your local Chevrolet dealer, before making a purchasing decision. E.&.O.E. You may NOT reproduce this car review in full or part, in any format without our written permission. carpages.co.uk © 2017