Chevrolet Captiva Review (2007)

Chevrolet Captiva
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Chevrolet Captiva Review

Chevrolet Captiva Review | Part TwoChevrolet Captiva Road Test

Chevrolet tells us that it invented the SUV back in 1936 with the Suburban Carryall, which was the first 7-seater to include ‘rough-road’ suspension.

Chevrolet tells us that it invented the SUV back in 1936 with the Suburban Carryall, which was the first 7-seater to include ‘rough-road’ suspension.

That may well have been the first but the latest car from the Chevy stable, the Captiva was launched earlier this year (2007). It had been a while coming as it was first introduced to the world as the S3X concept at the 2004, Paris Motor Show. Little has changed twixt concept and Captiva - the chunky proportions are more than a suggestion of its sporty nature and carrying capacity.

The ‘sporty’ elements can be seen in the black, plastic wheel arch spats and sills that run all the way around the base of the body and the silver-effect, front and rear skid-plates on the LTX offer a further clue.

Strong design lines run from the front wheel arches, through the door handles, to the rear light clusters and the heavy bonnet creases add a touch of style, topped off by a weighty front grille bearing the ‘bow-tie’ badge. Strangely, it isn’t until it is parked amongst other cars that the imposing style and size is appreciated.

The Captiva has the honour of being the first Chevrolet to be designed for every market, no matter which country. So, the Captiva we have in the UK is the same as that in Australia or Russia, where, incidentally, the company has a huge following.

Unlike its sister car, the Vauxhall Antara, the Captiva has more of a family slant - a point proven by the brochures. There is not a child in sight in the Antara brochure but the Captiva’s is full of family images. The Captiva also comes as a 7-seater. In fact the five-seat version is in the minority. To break it down; there are three trim levels and two engine options. The LS comes with a 2.4-litre, petrol engine and five seats only and is priced at £16,995. The LT and LTX house Chevrolet’s first diesel engine, the 2.0-litre unit, only and it is just the LT that has five seats (19,995) as well as seven (£21,140). Both of these two top trim levels also offer the option of a 5-speed automatic transmission, which adds £1,085 to the cost the 5-speed manual.

Chevrolet Captiva Review | Part TwoChevrolet Captiva Road Test
Chevrolet Captiva Road Test Data
Model ReviewedChevrolet Captiva 2.0 VCDi LTX Automatic (7-Seat)
  
Body TypeSUV
ColourLinen Beige Metallic
  
Performance (manufacturers data) 
  
0 - 62 mph12.2 Seconds
Top Speed 112 mph
  
Transmission5-Speed Automatic
  
Fuel TypeDiesel
  
CO2 Emissions (NEDC Figures) g/km
  
Economy (NEDC Figures) 
  
Urban26.4 mpg
Extra Urban38.7 mpg
Combined32.8 mpg
  
Insurance Group12
Euro NCAP Rating4
Warranty3-Year / 60,000 Mile Warranty
Price (when tested on the 12/11/07)£24,825

The information contained within this Chevrolet Captiva review may have changed since publication on the 12 November 2007. The actual model road tested may feature options and functionality specific to that model, which may not be available as on option or be fitted to other models in the range. Options may not be available on UK specification cars. You may wish to check with your local Chevrolet dealer, before making a purchasing decision. E.&.O.E. You may NOT reproduce this car review in full or part, in any format without our written permission. carpages.co.uk © 2017