The New BMW M6 | Part Three (2004)

BMW M6

BMW 6 Series

The Integral IV rear axle assembly is also made from aluminium to reduce unsprung masses. In addition, the new M6 features BMW’s variable, speed-sensing M Differential Lock. Featured on all current BMW M models, the M Differential Lock builds up locking action whenever one of the rear wheels begins to spin, channelling drive to the wheel with the most grip to improve handling and stability.

Electronic Damper Control is also standard on the M6. Offering the driver three suspension settings - Comfort, Normal and Sport, drivers can select the most appropriate setting for their driving style or road conditions. The new BMW M6 also features a BMW M version of Servotronic steering with two specific settings corresponding to the Electronic Damper Control settings, Sport or Comfort.

BMW’s DSC stability control system has been adapted for the M6. Featuring M Dynamic Mode (first seen on the new M5), drivers can take their cars to the limit of the laws of physics, allowing considerable angles of controllable oversteer when circumstances allow.

The new BMW M6 comes with a Power button (pioneered in the M5) in the centre console. Initially the car pre-selects the P400 setting, delivering 400bhp for town or city driving, for example. Engaging the Power button modifies the response of the throttle and enables the P500 setting to deliver the full 507bhp generated by the V10 engine.

Control of all of these features has been brought together using the M6’s MDrive Manager. MDrive allows the driver to pre-select specific settings for the Power button, SMG gearbox, DSC, EDC and Head-up Display. With one push of the steering wheel-mounted button, the driver selects his or her chosen character. For example, the car can be set up for an exciting 30 mile A-road drive to and from work or, on the other hand, for a city commute. More extreme settings can be pre-programmed for track use.

For a car with such potential, high performance brakes are needed and the new BMW M6 doesn’t disappoint. Using aluminium double piston callipers and cross-drilled disc brakes, the car can stop from 62mph in just 36 metres and from 124mph (200km/h) in only 140 metres - equivalent to 1.3g deceleration.

BMW M6 | Part Four
Published 15 December 2004 Melanie Carter
 

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