BMW X5 3.0sd

BMW X5 3.0sd

The New BMW X5 3.0sd

Published 28 June 2007 Melanie Carter

World’s most powerful production six-cylinder diesel engine comes to the X5
M Sport specification available across the range BMW’s class-leading Sports Activity Vehicle is now available with the world’s most powerful production six-cylinder diesel powerplant. The award-winning twin-turbocharged 3.0-litre diesel engine has been brought to the BMW X5 range to cater for a growing demand for performance SAVs.

The BMW X5 3.0sd provides the driver with 286hp and a flat torque curve with a peak of 580Nm from a lowly 1,750rpm to ensure rapid performance. The X5 3.0sd is capable of accelerating from zero to 62mph in 7.0 seconds before going on to a top speed of 146mph.

The drivetrain in the BMW X5 3.0sd is unique in its segment as it utilises two differently sized turbochargers operating in sequential stages depending on driver inputs. The key to the engine’s smooth power delivery is that, despite the mechanics of two turbochargers providing variable power, they deliver a consistent 2.85bar pressure to the intercooler at all times. One smaller turbocharger provides near instantaneous power at low engine speeds, while a larger turbocharger provides the mid to top end power. The boost of both turbochargers is regulated by an ECU and three control valves. This arrangement ensures optimum performance delivery from just above idle speed through to the red line and makes for impressive performance figures and an absence of turbo lag. 
Power in the X5 3.0sd is transmitted to the road via a standard six-speed automatic gearbox and BMW’s renowned xDrive four-wheel drive system. Complementing xDrive technology is the use of Dynamic Stability Control+ including Dynamic Traction Control. DSC+ is the most advanced stability control system currently available on a production car and comes with four additional features above and beyond the original DSC system. DSC+ adds Hill-start assistant, Brake pre-tensioning, Brake fade compensation and Brake drying. Dynamic Traction Control, when engaged, allows for a degree of wheel slip to permit forward motion on slippery surfaces such as ice and snow. It also allows the keener driver to revel in the handling characteristics of the X5 without the DSC+ interrupting the flow unless the situation becomes critical.

Diesel power accounts for more than 90 per cent of X5 sales in the UK and the new X5 3.0sd is being introduced to satisfy the wishes of some existing X5 owners who asked for an even greater level of performance. To cope with this the X5 3.0sd features uprated brakes compared to a standard 3.0d and comes fitted with thicker and larger diameter disc brakes for greater retardation. For a subtle and discreet visual differentiation between the two diesel X5 models the 3.0sd also has a chrome kidney grille with titanium vertical slats.

The BMW X5 3.0sd is on sale now and costs £42,630 OTR for SE versions and £47,675 OTR for the M Sport.

The announcement of the X5 3.0sd coincides with the news that the M Sport trim level is now available on the rest of the BMW X5 range. Launched initially on the 4.8-litre car only, M Sport allows customers to further personalise their vehicle. Standard M Sport equipment includes 19-inch light alloy M V-spoke wheels, M Aerodynamic bodystyling, M leather steering wheel, Sports suspension, Sports seats, Nevada leather upholstery, Anthracite headlining and Brushed Aluminium interior trim.

The BMW X5 3.0si M Sport costs £44,690 OTR while the X5 3.0d M Sport costs £45,265 OTR. The BMW X5 4.8i M Sport tops the range and costs £53,440 OTR.


The information contained this BMW X5 news article may have changed since publication on the 28 June 2007. Our car specifications, reviews, and prices may only apply to the UK market. You may wish to check with the manufacturer or your local BMW dealer, before making a purchasing decision. E.&.O.E. You may NOT reproduce our car news in full or part, in any format without our written permission. © 2015