Bentley Continental GTC Review

Bentley Continental GTC
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Bentley Continental Review

Bentley Continental GTC ReviewBentley Continental GTC Road Test

As befits its huge price tag, this is a convertible that demands no sacrifices. At the touch of a switch, the hood rapidly folds back and stows flat below the car’s rear waistline, and it just as quickly rises and seals itself shut again.

Ride and Handling

Some changes have been made to the Continental GTC’s chassis. The track has been widened by 48 mm at the rear and 41 mm at the front to broaden the car’s stance on the road. The steering has been retuned for a sharper turn-in, and the stability control system has been recalibrated to make it less interventive. These revisions enhance the driving experience. Handling calibre is very good. You can feel the GTC’s bulk in the way it drives, but it is as nimble as a car this big can reasonably be, and grips tenaciously on tight bends.

Bentley staged the launch of the GTC in the Croatia, on a mixture of roads that ranged from pockmarked urban back streets to millpond-smooth new motorways. The car handled these varying surfaces with aplomb, thanks to a ride quality that is absorbent and irons out all but the worst undulations. The GTC gives excellent ride comfort and isolates driver and passengers from any rough road inconvenience.

Ease of Use

As befits its huge price tag, this is a convertible that demands no sacrifices. At the touch of a switch, the hood rapidly folds back and stows flat below the car’s rear waistline, and it just as quickly rises and seals itself shut again. At slow speed, you can do it on the move. Hood down, there is the usual overhead wind-rush that unavoidably raises the noise level of an open convertible, but it is not accompanied by a hair-raking breeze inside the car. The cabin remains a surprising oasis of calm. When the hood is up, it seals tight and ensures that there is no ruffling wind-noise to contend with, and so interior noise level remains low.

One irritation about the cabin is the positioning of the indicator stalk and the gear-shift paddles. These paddles are unusually large, and set in a quarter-to-three position behind the steering wheel, rather than the more natural ten-to-two. As a result the indicator lever is positioned unusually low, and it does not feel a very natural arrangement, meriting a re-think. Boot space, at 260 litres, is not huge considering the car’s size, but the boot is conveniently well-shaped.

Bentley Continental GTC ReviewBentley Continental GTC Road Test
Bentley Continental Road Test Data
Model ReviewedBentley Continental GTC
  
Body TypeConvertible
ColourBlue Crystal
  
Performance (manufacturers data) 
  
0 - 62 mph4.8 seconds
Top Speed 195 mph
  
Transmission6-Speed Automatic
  
Fuel TypeUnleaded Petrol
  
CO2 Emissions (NEDC Figures) g/km
  
Economy (NEDC Figures) 
  
Urban11.1 mpg
Extra Urban24.9 mpg
Combined17.1 mpg
  
Insurance Group50
Euro NCAP Rating
Warranty3 years / Unlimited miles
Price (when tested on the 29/11/11)£149,350

The information contained within this Bentley Continental review may have changed since publication on the 29 November 2011. The actual model road tested may feature options and functionality specific to that model, which may not be available as on option or be fitted to other models in the range. Options may not be available on UK specification cars. You may wish to check with your local Bentley dealer, before making a purchasing decision. E.&.O.E. You may NOT reproduce this car review in full or part, in any format without our written permission. carpages.co.uk © 2017